Skip Ribbon Commands Skip to main content
Blog

Quick Launch

Community Matters

Category : Diversity

Hello Fellows: Meet Shawn Schuette
​Wilder employees have the opportunity to apply for Kingston Fellowships, an honor awarded annually based on accomplishments, commitment to human services and leadership potential. In March 2017, Wilder awarded fellowships to six employees spanning a variety of professional backgrounds. The fellowships help these professionals to study, teach, conduct research, exchange ideas and develop innovative programs to address community concerns. In “Hello, Fellows,” we introduce the most recent cohort of Kingston Fellows. This week, we catch up with Shawn Schuette. What is your role at Wilder? I am a Senior Clinical Supervisor in Wilder’s school-based mental health program, and have been with Kofi for 9 years. Kofi is a culturally specific program serving African-American students in St. Paul Public Schools. School based staff work with clients individually, in group,...
Read more and comment »   (0 Comments)
​Hello Fellows: Meet Damon Shoholm
Wilder employees have the opportunity to apply for Kingston Fellowships, an honor awarded annually based on accomplishments, commitment to human services and leadership potential.In March 2017, Wilder awarded fellowships to six employees spanning a variety of professional backgrounds. The fellowships help these professionals to study, teach, conduct research, exchange ideas and develop innovative programs to address community concerns. In “Hello, Fellows,” we introduce the most recent cohort of Kingston Fellows. This week, we catch up with Damon Shoholm. What is your role at Wilder? I’m a director of Leadership Programs at Wilder. I work in concert with Nou Yang of the Youth Leadership Initiative to administratively and programmatically shape the suite of leadership programs that Wilder offers to a greater community. Tell us about your background. Before coming to Wilder, my...
Read more and comment »   (0 Comments)
Immigration, Communities, Foundations
All communities experience immigration. No question whether it will occur, just when and how much. Some of us arrived as immigrants ourselves to a new nation; the rest of us descended from ancestors who came from somewhere else, to settle in a land still pristine or already inhabited. Political events, economics, wars, environmental changes, and other events cause people to move, voluntarily and involuntarily. Worldwide trends suggest that immigration will continue on a major scale, with implications for nations and for their constituent regions and communities. Since 1990, the immigrant population in the United States has doubled; in Minnesota during that same period, the immigrant population quadrupled. Speaking for Ourselves Study Using newly gathered information from the Wilder Research “Speaking for Ourselves” study, in combination with data from...
Read more and comment »   (0 Comments)
Senseless Killing, but Hope Exists
Wilder Research Executive Director Paul Mattessich​Philando Castile, driving with two passengers, including a four-year-old child, is shot during a police traffic stop. He dies. It’s senseless.What can we do about this? How can we prevent it from happening again?In 2013, when police in the United States committed 461 “justifiable homicides,” police officers in England and Wales killed exactly zero people. Do we in the United States have violent tendencies so much worse than residents of England, so that shooting us becomes necessary in order to maintain the peace? In the Falcon Heights, Minnesota incident, the police officer seems like an upstanding community member, dedicated to helping others. He likely did not go to work expecting or intending to kill someone. Did sufficient information exist in that officer’s mind to justify a...
Read more and comment »   (0 Comments)
​Neurodiversity in the Workplace
Do you know what neurodiversity is or have you heard the term neurodiverse condition? Dyslexia and attention deficit disorder are examples of neurodiverse conditions. Neurodiversity is a concept where neurological differences are to be recognized and respected as any other human variation. These differences can include those labeled with Dyspraxia, Dyslexia, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Dyscalculia, Autistic Spectrum, Tourette Syndrome, and others. My name is Grant Watkins and I manage the volunteer program at the Wilder Community Center for Aging. I am passionate about the importance of developing a resilient spirit and empathy for others living with silent disabilities who may be isolated, ignored or discriminated against. As a gay person living with a significant hearing impairment, dyslexia and attention deficit disorder, I know firsthand...
Read more and comment »   (0 Comments)
​Immigrants Speak Out, Organizations Respond
Speaking for OurselvesMinnesota’s late Senator Paul Wellstone used to say, “We all do better when we all do better!” Here at Wilder Research we work to ensure that “we all do better” by conducting research to better understand how to promote equity and well-being for all people. I recently was part of the research team to learn more about the growing and diverse immigrant and refugee communities living in the Twin Cities. The study, Speaking for Ourselves, asks five different immigrant communities in the Twin Cities what issues are important to them. Wilder Research held an Action Summit in April 2016 with the goal of sharing innovative strategies to address the issues participants identified in the study. Panelists from organizations and government agencies shared their work related...
Read more and comment »   (0 Comments)
3 Ways to Use Speaking for Ourselves Data in Your Work
The recently completed Speaking for Ourselves study provides up-to-date data about the experiences of immigrants and refugees who live in Hennepin and Ramsey counties. The community-wide assessment highlights the needs, strengths, and service gaps among Hmong, Karen, Latino, Liberian, and Somali populations. The study aims to provide information to change perceptions, improve public policies, and provide better services. I’ve outlined three ways you can use the data to help inform your work. These are just examples – the Speaking for Ourselves data and reports may be useful in any situation in which background or information is needed about one of the participating cultural communities. Example 1: Provide context A local news outlet is doing a story about behavioral health needs within the Karen community.   There are two...
Read more and comment »   (0 Comments)
Hello, Fellows: Meet Bobby Morrow
The Kingston Fellowship is an honor awarded to Wilder employees annually from the Kingston Fellowship named endowment fund established with a lead gift from retired Wilder President Tom Kingston and his wife Mary, and contributed to by many friends of the Wilder Foundation. In March 2016, Wilder awarded fellowships to 11 employees spanning a variety of professional backgrounds. The fellowships help these professionals to study, teach, conduct research, exchange ideas and develop innovative programs to address community concerns. "In Hello, Fellows," we introduce the 2016 Kingston Fellows. This week, we catch up with Bobby Morrow. What is your role at Wilder? When I started at Wilder I worked with children in our Family Supportive Housing Services. Now I’m a family case manager for Wilder’s rapid rehousing program, the...
Read more and comment »   (0 Comments)
Rejecting the Single Story: How a Partnership Is Bridging Community Voices to Local History
​“Stories matter. Many stories matter. Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign, but stories can also be used to empower and to humanize…When we reject the single story, when we realize there is never a single story about any place, we regain a kind of paradise.” Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: The Danger of a Single Story   Engaging with, and raising up, the diverse stories of our community here in Saint Paul, Minnesota, is one central goal of the partnership between two local institutions, the Minnesota Historical Society and the Amherst H. Wilder Foundation. Together, these institutions have partnered to deliver the Neighborhood Leadership Program (NLP), which engages existing and emerging leaders from diverse backgrounds to take informed action on important issues facing Saint Paul and Minnesota.   Though...
Read more and comment »   (0 Comments)
Social Research: A Tool for Promoting Justice and Quality of Life
Paul Mattessich​In this digital age, millions of people can tweet instantly about the issues of their choice: economics, jobs, racial disparities, violence, education, transportation, the environment, and so on. News media and advocates can raise awareness and provoke debates. Major social issues all seem to contain pressing challenges that demand solutions as quickly as possible. In this era of instant information is social research still relevant? Does the laborious process of systematically gathering and interpreting information add value? That question focuses on the raison d’etre of Wilder Research and other organizations that do social research. I would suggest that we find social research motivating and fulfilling because we see it as a means to improve the quality of life for all people in a just way. Some...
Read more and comment »   (0 Comments)
1 - 10Next
 

 Categories

 

Looking For Something Else? Facebook icon Twitter icon
Site Map
Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 451 Lexington Parkway North, Saint Paul, Minnesota 55104 Phone: 651-280-2000
Sign In